Meghan Markle's Wedding Bouquet - Hidden Meanings

 Photo: The Royal Family's Twitter page

Photo: The Royal Family's Twitter page

The wedding of Meghan Markle to Prince Harry was classy and beautiful in so many ways, and Meghan's wedding bouquet was no exception to this.

The wedding day itself was a beautiful, sunny day and a truly remarkable setting for a modern royal bride. Dreams can come true!

From a florist's perspective, we were expecting to see a large, glamorous wedding bouquet that complimented Meghan's amazing, elegant and stylish dress. But what we saw was a small bouquet similar in size to those often used for bridesmaids.

At first glance, Meghan's bouquet seems at odds and out of place in the grand event of a royal wedding. But when we look closer, we can more fully appreciate the beauty of her bouquet. Wedding bouquets should always complement the bride and not detract or distract. The choice of a petite design is in complete harmony with her petite frame, and didn't add extra weight to her outfit - she had enough to manage already with her long train! The bridal bouquet, although smaller than some may expect, also perfectly accentuated her classy, minimalistic dress.

The all-white bouquet, created by London-based florist Philippa Craddock, reportedly included blooms that Prince Harry picked from their private garden at Kensington Palace. This beautiful gesture is one every bride would love - the groom picking and bringing flowers to his bride on their wedding day. How romantic!

 Photo: Getty Images

Photo: Getty Images

Wedding bouquets all have a variety of flowers, including filler flowers that reveal hidden meanings of good wishes, traditions and a unique love story. Meghan's bouquet was meaningful and beautiful in so many ways, followed with several royal wedding traditions, and each flower chosen for the bouquet has its own special significance.

Meghan's beautiful bouquet included forget-me-nots, sprigs of myrtle, lily of the valley, astilbe, astrantia, scented sweet peas and jasmine, all bound together with a naturally-dyed, raw silk ribbon.

 Photo: The bouquet placed on the grave of the Unknown Warrior inside Westminster Abbey in London. Photo credit: Getty Images

Photo: The bouquet placed on the grave of the Unknown Warrior inside Westminster Abbey in London. Photo credit: Getty Images

Forget-Me-Not

Forget-Me-Nots are beautiful flowers. They were also Princess Diana's favourite flower, and the couple specifically chose to include these in Meghan's bouquet to honour the memory of the late Princess of the special day.

Adding to the personal significance of the Forget-Me-Not, they also have special meanings of their own. Taking time to remember those you love, even if they aren't with you right now. Making a special moment last. Respect the dead and make sure their stories are still being told to future generations.

They also signify true and undying love, connections that last throughout time, as well as fidelity and loyalty in a relationship even despite separation or other challenges. What a beautiful choice for a wedding bouquet!

 Photo credit: Lambley Gardens & Nursery, Ascot, Victoria

Photo credit: Lambley Gardens & Nursery, Ascot, Victoria

Myrtle

Sprigs of myrtle were included in Meghan's bouquet. The myrtle sprigs were from stems planted at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, by Queen Victoria in 1845, and from a plant grown from the myrtle used in The Queen's wedding bouquet in 1947.

The tradition of carrying myrtle began after Queen Victoria was given a nosegay containing myrtle

 Photo credit: Crocus

Photo credit: Crocus

Lily of the Valley

Lily of the Valley flowers traditionally symbolise humility, chastity, sweetness, purity and is said to bring good luck in love. It also signifies the return of happiness. In Holland, the flower is planted in a newlywed couple's garden as a symbol of the renewal of love! These flowers have a distinctive and beautiful fragrance that will always stir up memories of their wedding day!

 Photo credit: Longfield Gardens

Photo credit: Longfield Gardens

Astilbe

Astilbe has wide-branching flowers, and it is soft like a feather. The meaning of astilbe is "I will still be waiting". These delicate flowers are very popular for weddings today.

 Photo credit: Garden Lovers Club Blog

Photo credit: Garden Lovers Club Blog

Astrantia

The Astrantia plant has delicate, star-shaped pin-cushion flowers on fine stems. Astrantia need lots of water before being used in a bouquet, and are popular as a filler flower in Southern Europe. They symbolise strength, courage, and protection.

 Photo credit: Crocus

Photo credit: Crocus

Scented Sweet Pea

Scented Sweet Peas symbolise blissful, delicate pleasure, and also are used to represent the sentiment 'thank you for a lovely time'. They have a lovely soft fragrance, and are commonly used in traditional wedding bouquets.

 Photo credit: Flowerona Blog

Photo credit: Flowerona Blog

Jasmine

The Jasmine flower is associated with love, and also symbolises beauty and sensuality, appreciation and good luck. In religious ceremonies, jasmine also represents purity.

 Photo credit: Crocus

Photo credit: Crocus

What a bouquet! Amazing symbolism, so much elegance and simplicity through presentation - this bouquet really represented both Meghan and the couple's wishes for their future.


We hope that Meghan's bouquet sets a trend for future brides - to look at their bouquet like a representation of them as an individual and also their hopes and dreams for their marriage. A wedding bouquet shows their love story and wishes, in flowers. Brides can also take inspiration from Meghan's bouquet in ensuring their bouquet is not too big, and is consistent with their dress, elegant, easy to carry and light, yet trendy and beautiful.

The wedding of The Duke and Duchess of Sussex was elegant, classy and romantic. Meghan's bouquet will remain classy and on trend in years to come.

 Photo credit: Alexi Lubomirski

Photo credit: Alexi Lubomirski